Marjan Teeuwen | Destroyed House: Monument of the Temporary

June 20 - September 29, 2019
Museum De Lakenhal, The Netherlands
Selected Works Thumbnail View
Destroyed House Leiden 7, 2016Destroyed House Leiden 7, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 7, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 1, 2016Destroyed House Leiden 1, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 1, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 5, 2016Destroyed House Leiden 5, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 5, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 6, 2016Destroyed House Leiden 6, 2016

Destroyed House Leiden 6, 2016

Archive Leiden, 2016Archive Leiden, 2016

Archive Leiden, 2016

Press Release

Museum De Lakenhal will restore and expand from October 2016 to spring 2019. To make room for this expansion, four buildings were demolished on the Lammermarkt, the rear of the museum. As a final tribute to these buildings, Marjan Teeuwen was asked to develop a temporary, grand architectural installation here. From mid-February to 10 July 2015, Marjan Teeuwen and her small team worked almost non-stop on this project and transformed four old, derelict buildings into a breathtaking spatial installation that enchanted all types of visitors. Destroyed Huis Leiden attracted 3774 visitors during the opening and could count on a large stream of publicity and many positive reactions.

 

In the weeks following the closure of the Verwoest Huis Leiden installation, Marjan Teeuwen continued to work on the realization of a photo series; the only remaining elements from this project. In close collaboration with a technical photographer, she created seven monumental compositions of parts from the architectural installation. All photos are included in the collection. They are not only artistic expressions - photos with an autonomous power - but they also refer in an abstract way to the socio-economic history of Leiden, the (early) industrialization and the history of the location.

 

At least two of the photos will be permanently presented after the reopening of Museum De Lakenhal (spring 2019) in the passage to the new building, as a substantive and artistic reference to what has disappeared.