Jesse Chehak

Western Views
September 4 - October 11, 2008
20th St.
Selected Works Thumbnail View
Towards Sequoia Park, California, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesTowards Sequoia Park, California, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Towards Sequoia Park, California, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Dusk, California, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesDusk, California, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Dusk, California, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Primm, Nevada, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesPrimm, Nevada, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Primm, Nevada, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Climax Mine Near Leadville, Colorado, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesClimax Mine Near Leadville, Colorado, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Climax Mine Near Leadville, Colorado, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Bison, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesBison, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Bison, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Independence Rock, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inchesIndependence Rock, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007 Chromogenic print 40 x 50 inches

Independence Rock, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, 2007
Chromogenic print
40 x 50 inches

Press Release

Bruce Silverstein / 20 is pleased to announce Western Views, a selection of landscapes from Jesse Chehak’s ongoing series Fools Gold.

 

“Like superb writers of the new west such as Ian Frazier or Timothy Egan, Jesse Chehak manages to put a view of place that is at once laconic, profound, light-hearted, and sad. That unnamable exhilaration one feels in the American West is in his pictures.” - Joel Sternfeld

 

The proliferation of landscape photography in the American West beginning in the late 19th century - following a robust program of federal land grants and a fervent gold rush - transformed our vision of the western expanse from a rogue frontier to a land suddenly laden with untapped enterprise and promise. Photographers of the period sought to reveal the region’s opportunity for growth and cultivation as a central theme to their images, often including the evidence of human encroachment in their photographs to support such beliefs. The resulting effect was an assimilation of the land’s meaning with the bountiful opportunities of the period and the consequences of the then burgeoning industrial revolution.

 

 

Jesse Chehak’s ongoing series, Fools Gold, recalls the reverence for nature held by the earliest members of the Western Survey photography movement from over a century ago. Chehak, much like his predecessors, regards the opportunism of the west with an acute sanguinity, citing the region’s bountiful splendor as evidence of its still-unspoiled terrain. Equally, Chehak’s purist approach to the medium speaks to his 19th century counterparts - using only a map and field camera as tools for navigating the terrain. Taking aesthetic cues from the German Romanticist movement, Chehak searches the region for breathtaking vistas to illustrate his veneration for the environment. Picturesque beauty abounds in the images - verdant fields lie beneath blue skies, mountains bathe in golden dusks, bison roam in the forest’s clearings, each serving as a perceptive reminder of the humbling admiration we experience when confronted with such natural resplendence.

 

Jesse Chehak’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States and abroad. Mr. Chehak has been the recipient of the 2007 Magenta Emerging Photographer Award, as well as being featured in the 2005 Twenty Breakthrough Talents sponsored by Print Magazine, and the 2005 30 Under 30 sponsored by Photo District News. Chehak contributes regularly to the New York Times Magazine, Wallpaper, and Men’s Vogue, among others. The artist currently lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico.